Luxury Kilimanjaro tours

Luxury is a relative term when applied to a Kilimanjaro climb. Overnight options boil down to hunkering down in a sleeping bag in a hiking tent or a basic mountain hut, and if you want to summit the great mountain, there is no escaping the steep uphill hikes, nor the cold on the upper slopes, nor the likely affects of altitude. In one sense, the most luxurious way to climb the mountain is to stick to the popular Marangu Route, which is much busier than other routes, but allows you to stay overnight in the relatively comfort of mountain huts with washing facilities and bottled drinks for sale.

luxury accommodation kilimanjaro

However, if you are looking for exclusivity rather than luxury per se, then far better to splash out and arrange to hike on of the lesser known routes. Depending on how much time and money you want to dedicate to the exercise, these range from the Machame and Rongai Route, both ideally undertaken over six days, to the slightly longer Lemosho and Shira Route, to the wonderfully scenic and remote Northern Circuit, a new route that can be undertaken over 9-11 days, depending on whether you opt to overnight in the stunning Kibo Crater. It is also worth researching the amenities offered by different operators - high quality food and equipment, experienced English-speaking guides and access to private ablution tents with pump-flush toilets all come at a price, but help enhance not only the comfort of a climb but also the likelihood of reaching the summit.


Our Recommended Itinerary

Two Peak Challenge: Mount Meru and Kilimanjaro (13 days)

day 1

day 2

Momella Gate (1500 m) – Miriakamba Hut (2500 m)

day 3

Miriakamba Hut (2 500 m) – Saddle Hut (3 550 m)

day 4

Saddle Hut (3 550 m) – Socialist Peak (4 562 m) –

day 5

Miriakamba Hut (2 500 m) – Momella Gate (1 500 m)

day 6

day 7

Arusha – Machame Gate (1 790 m) – Machame Camp (3

day 8

Machame Camp (3 010 m) – New Shira Camp (3 845 m)

day 9

New Shira Camp (3 845 m) – Lava Tower (4 640 m) –

day 10

Barranco Camp (3 960 m) – Barafu Camp (4 640 m)

day 11

Barafu Camp (4 640 m) – Uhuru Peak (5,895 m) – Mwe

day 12

Mweka Camp (3 080 m) – Mweka Gate (1 630 m) – Arus

day 13

Departure

View Full Itinerary

Popular Kilimanjaro National Park Safaris

These popular itineraries can be customised to match your budget and travel dates



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Luxury Kilimanjaro tours

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November is a wet month, even by Kilimanjaro’s soggy standards, so it isn’t an optimum time for climbing. As is the case throughout the year, ground temperatures drop below freezing at night at higher altitudes, but November is colder and windier than average. Avoid if possible. ...

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Affordable Kilimanjaro climb

The biggest costs associated with a Kilimanjaro climb are the high park fees and support costs. There is no way around these, but it will help keep things affordable to form or join a group of like-minded hikers, rather that travelling solo or as couple, and to stick to the very busy Marangu Route, which is the only one with mountain huts at every overnight stop, and poses fewer…

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