Menu

HERDTRACKER

Discover Africa Migration Safaris

This video shot by
Alex Walker's Serian
in The Mara Triangle
26 minutes ago

Latest Updates From The Migration

Epic Crossing on the Mara River below the Lookout Hill moving into the Mara Triangle. 

The great herds were captured crossing for over two hours and more were still coming by the time the guests and safari guides left. 

Experience one of Africa's greatest spectacles – smell the dust and hear the noise of thousands of animals crossing the Mara River

The Great Migration continues to cross the Sand River on the Masai Mara side. 

The Sand River Masai Mara offers guests a secluded position from which to observe the splendours of Kenya. Game drives and hot-air balloon safaris provide spectacular and year-round Big 5 game viewing. Those who visit between July and November will witness one of the greatest spectacles in Africa: the Great Migration.

The great wildebeest migration has finally arrived in the Sand River!!

They were spotted crossing the Sand River heading into the Mara Reserve. Located on the banks of a river from which it has taken its name, Sand River Masai Mara is located within the Masai Mara National Reserve, close to the Tanzanian border.

With an authentic safari experience, superb cuisine, a well-stocked cellar, sparkling pool, hot-air ballooning and your private viewing deck, Sand River Masai Mara offers a winning combination.

The great wildebeest migration is negotiating their way northbound, following recent rains in the Lamai Wedge of the Northern Serengeti

Between July and October Lamai Serengeti in a prime position to witness the Great Migration of hundreds of thousands of wildebeest, and is close enough to the Mara River to experience the awe-inspiring river crossings where masses of animals confront the deep, fast-flowing water and the enormous crocodiles that live within it. But even beyond the Migration season, a wealth of wildlife remains to be enjoyed. Game drives and safari walks accompanied by highly knowledgeable guides deliver a thrilling Big 5 experience, including an abundance of birds.

July marks the start of the Mara River crossings as well as the mating season in the Serengeti!

The herds have reached the western Serengeti and are peering closely at the brown waters of the rivers they have to cross. Why? Huge Nile crocodiles, that's why!

A very huge herd of the wildebeest were seen crossing number 8 from Kogatende side to Lamai Wedge.

Lamai is a triangular-shaped watershed area just north of the Mara River. Lamai's freshwater and verdant grasslands serve as a critical refuge for the wildebeest and zebra during the dry season. In fact, the majority of the migration usually resides here from July until November. It's one of East Africa's best secrets that during the dry season, the secluded Lamai Triangle holds more of the migration then the more heavily touristy Masai Mara Game Reserve just to the north in Kenya

Lamai Serengeti Camp is set amongst the rocks of Kogakuria Kopje with panoramic views in a remote corner of the northern Serengeti, just 4-minutes from where the wildebeest cross the Mara River, usually between late July and October.

Perfect as a honeymoon destination or as a luxury retreat from which to enjoy the many splendours of the Serengeti, Lamai Serengeti Main Camp delivers the very best that this extraordinary region has to offer, from an incredible location to exceptional guiding, service and cuisine.

Safari guide Paul witnessed the biggest herd around Fort Ikoma heading towards the north. Some of the herds are in the Kogatende area. 

Fort Ikoma is located next to a small settlement a few kilometres north of Fort Ikoma gate. It also is near the Ikoma airstrip, and on a narrow strip of land between Serengeti, Grumeti and Ikongoro game reserve.

Lots of herds in Kogatende, moving towards the Mara River in the Serengeti side!

July is a warm month. As the dry season approaches, the Serengeti landscape becomes arider.

The wildebeest herds begin moving faster in search of water and greener grass, making their way across the Grumeti and Mara River. Expect to see crocodile encounters.

Resident Loita wildebeest are spread out in the northeast conservancies and no longer extend to the Loita Hills. The grass levels are palatable for the young calves in the northeast conservancies. 

There are no signs of the Serengeti wildebeest yet (still early days). They are more than likely still moving through the Serengeti, Naabi Hill and Maswa areas. The entire ecosystem has been regenerated to quite an extent due to heavy rainfalls from November 2019 until mid-February 2020. 

The great wildebeest migration is building the next 'migration army' as 80% of wildebeest females intuitively give birth to about 80,00 wildebeest babies every day. 

This replenishes the herds and ultimately creates the need for more pastures!

Ngorongoro Serena Safari Lodge is built on the rim of the Ngorongoro Crater, and its natural stone and ivy-covered walls blends in with its surroundings. The lodge has taken the cave paintings of Olduvai Gorge as its main décor inspiration, with all the interiors filled with African artifacts and frescos. Enjoy a wide range of activities, from game drives on the Crater plains to guided nature walks, bush dining experiences, visits to Maasai

The Calving Season in the southern Serengeti is in full swing! 

A big herd of the great migration was spotted moving towards the Kusini and Naabi Hill. However, some herds are still roaming on the open plains of the Ndutu and Gol Mountains.

Heavy rainfalls have stopped. 

Wildebeest and zebras are calving on the plains in the south and east of Seronera, around Ndutu and in the north of the Ngorongoro Conservation Area.

Be prepared for some heartache as well, the predators move quickly onto the newborn calves for their annual feast. Mother Nature is revealing what the circle of life means in full gore and vigour.

At the edge of the short grasses is where the highest concentration of predators congregate, waiting to seize any vulnerable calves.

You can book your Ndutu accommodation well in advance with peace of mind, for a migration safari to the Serengeti in February.

The savannah is drying up, yet thousands of wildebeest are being born daily. February is the favoured month of the big cats

February is a good month to visit the Masai Mara if you want to see lots of baby animals (up to half a million wildebeest are born this month), and you don’t mind afternoon thundershowers. Wildlife viewing is good, and birdwatching is excellent, with many migratory species present in the park.

February is the peak of the Great Migration calving when 500,000 young wildebeest are born in a matter of weeks! Adding to this amazing sight is the sheer volume of predators – statistically, this is the highest build-up of predators anywhere in Africa, at any time of year. 

Wildebeest and zebras are calving on the plains in the south and east of Seronera, around Ndutu and in the north of the Ngorongoro Conservation Area.

You can see the plains come alive with calves; first standing on wobbly legs, and then running all within minutes of being born. Be prepared for some heartache as well, the predators move quickly onto the newborn calves for their annual feast. Mother Nature is revealing what the circle of life means in full gore and vigour.

At the edge of the short grasses is where the highest concentration of predators congregate, waiting to seize any vulnerable calves.

The plains herd animals give birth en-mass in a two to three week period creating a glut for the predators, thereby enabling more to survive those crucial first few weeks. Wildebeest usually give birth in the middle of the herd, forming a moving barricade around them trying to limit the amount of damage a predator can do.

Start of the long rain season in the southern part of Serengeti.

SEE MORE UPDATES

Our Partners

In the Media