Governors' Camp | Discover Africa Safaris
 

Discover Africa Safaris Governors’ Camp

The Governors' Camp Collection is an award winning collection of safari camps and lodges in Kenya and Rwanda. They specialise in wildlife safaris and are located in some of Africa's most iconic wilderness areas.

Updates

11 Oct 2018

Masses of the wildebeest were seen on the plains of the Masai Mara National Reserve drinking from the marsh in front of the Little Governors Camp.

- Image by George Murray
- Image by George Murray
- Image by George Murray
- Image by George Murray
- Image by George Murray
- Image by George Murray
16 Feb 2018

The Loita migration is quite dormant. The resident Gnu migration hasn't moved into the Loita Hills for the past 10 years due to human settlement in the area.

The Gnus have resided in the northeast conservancies including the Mara North, Olare Orok, Lemek and the Naibosho.

The wildebeest cows have started calving with the small herds in the Lemek and Mara North conservancies. However, a large number are further east in the Naibosho and Olare conservancies. 

Credit: Governors Camp Manager, Patrick Reynolds

16 Feb 2018

On Friday evening, Patrick Reynolds heard a quite a large herd of males crossing the Ngiatiak River coming from the Olare Orok Conservancy into the southeastern reserve. Additionally, a small herd of mainly males, were coming from the North Mara Conservancy. 

08 Feb 2018

Things are stagnant in the Musiara gate with only a few Loita wildebeest males seen close to the Masai Conservancies.

The large herds are in the north east conservancies. 

Credit: Governor's Camp manager, Patrick Reynolds 

18 Jan 2018

The resident Loita movement has been reserved to the short grass of the northern areas of the Mara Reserve.

To include the conservancies, the majority of wildebeest are in the Naboisho, Ol Kinyei and Olare Orok Conservancies with a few scattered herds (of which many are males) and will be seen in the northern reserve. 

Important note: These resident wildebeest no longer migrate into the Loita Hill areas due to human encroachment and settlement. 

Credit: Governors Camp Manager, Patrick Reynolds

22 Aug 2016

Herds from the wildebeest migration continue to cross the Mara River. Yesterday morning they gathered at an area called deadly crossing point. Then suddenly a lioness appeared cutting the herds in two. In panic one group as forced to cross the Mara river whilst the other group ran back towards the plains. It was a very quick crossing each fighting not to be at the back.

Moses Manduku Governors Camp, Head Driver - Guide.

The widebeest migration continue to cross the Mara River
The widebeest migration continue to cross the Mara River - Image by Moses Manduku
The widebeest migration continue to cross the Mara River
The widebeest migration continue to cross the Mara River - Image by Moses Manduku
The widebeest migration continue to cross the Mara River
The widebeest migration continue to cross the Mara River - Image by Moses Manduku
The widebeest migration continue to cross the Mara River
The widebeest migration continue to cross the Mara River - Image by Moses Manduku
20 Aug 2016

Kenya safari guide Timothy Leperes Laur sent us these stunning images of the wildebeest migration crossing the Mara River at the main crossing point. 

- Image by Timothy Leperes Laur
- Image by Timothy Leperes Laur
- Image by Timothy Leperes Laur
- Image by Timothy Leperes Laur
- Image by Timothy Leperes Laur
- Image by Timothy Leperes Laur
- Image by Timothy Leperes Laur
- Image by Timothy Leperes Laur
- Image by Timothy Leperes Laur
- Image by Timothy Leperes Laur
- Image by Timothy Leperes Laur
- Image by Timothy Leperes Laur
- Image by Timothy Leperes Laur
- Image by Timothy Leperes Laur
- Image by Timothy Leperes Laur
- Image by Timothy Leperes Laur
- Image by Timothy Leperes Laur
- Image by Timothy Leperes Laur
- Image by Timothy Leperes Laur
- Image by Timothy Leperes Laur
11 Aug 2016

There was a large crossing yesterday morning of around 10,000 Wildebeest and a few Zebra.

The evening before there was a huge herd that crossed the airstrip at 5.30 pm, they had come from the east marsh areas and were headed straight to the south bank of the Bila Shaka and joined up with an equally large herd, some of these had crossed that night although it was much of this herd that crossed the Mara river yesterday morning. There are still a few left on Paradise Plains and these may well cross today.

Photos are courtesy of Governors Il Moran Camp guest J. Plisnier

A huge herd builds up close to the crossing site
A huge herd builds up close to the crossing site - Image by J. Plisnier
The widebeest begin to file down towards the crossing site
The widebeest begin to file down towards the crossing site - Image by J. Plisnier
Wildebeest massing close to the Mara River
Wildebeest massing close to the Mara River - Image by J. Plisnier
Testing the waters
Testing the waters - Image by J. Plisnier
They begin to cross
They begin to cross - Image by J. Plisnier
Wildebeest migration cross the Mara River
Wildebeest migration cross the Mara River - Image by J. Plisnier
Wildebeest migration cross the Mara River
Wildebeest migration cross the Mara River - Image by J. Plisnier
Wildebeest migration cross the Mara River
Wildebeest migration cross the Mara River - Image by J. Plisnier
05 Aug 2016

Migration update from Governors' Camps

There was chaos at the crossing site. An estimated 20,000 wildebeest crossed coming from the Trans Mara area towards us. Three were taken by crocodile and two were trampled as they tried to scramble up the steep rocks on the Eastern bank.

Then out of nowhere lioness Jicho appeared on the far bank. She charged into the herds trying to take a wildebeest, three times she tried and on the final attempt was overrun by a mass of wildebeest, chaos ensued and she had to scramble up the bank to safety!

Photos courtesy of Patrick Reynolds, Governors Il Moran Camp Manager.

Jicho climbs for safety
Jicho climbs for safety - Image by Patrick Reynolds
Wildebeest at the Mara River
Wildebeest at the Mara River - Image by Patrick Reynolds
20,000 wildebeest cross the Mara River
20,000 wildebeest cross the Mara River - Image by Patrick Reynolds
Jicho climbs up the Mara River bank
Jicho climbs up the Mara River bank - Image by Patrick Reynolds
Thousands of wildebeest crossing the Mara River
Thousands of wildebeest crossing the Mara River - Image by Patrick Reynolds
The herds at the Mara River
The herds at the Mara River - Image by Patrick Reynolds
Wildebeest jump into the Mara River
Wildebeest jump into the Mara River - Image by Patrick Reynolds
Wildebeest running on the banks of the Mara River
Wildebeest running on the banks of the Mara River - Image by
21 Jul 2016

It was all action at the Mara River's main crossing point as wildebeest and zebra took the plunge, a lioness from the Paradise Pride was also there, taking down a wildebeest and a crocodile also took one wildebeest.

Photos are courtesy of Moses Manduku, Governors Camp Head Driver-Guide.

 Action at the Mara River
Action at the Mara River - Image by Moses Manduku
 Action at the Mara River
Action at the Mara River - Image by Moses Manduku
 Action at the Mara River
Action at the Mara River - Image by Moses Manduku
 Action at the Mara River
Action at the Mara River - Image by Moses Manduku
 Action at the Mara River
Action at the Mara River - Image by Moses Manduku
 Action at the Mara River
Action at the Mara River - Image by Moses Manduku
 Action at the Mara River
Action at the Mara River - Image by Moses Manduku
 Action at the Mara River
Action at the Mara River - Image by Moses Manduku
 Action at the Mara River
Action at the Mara River - Image by Moses Manduku
 Action at the Mara River
Action at the Mara River - Image by Moses Manduku
 Action at the Mara River
Action at the Mara River - Image by Moses Manduku
 Action at the Mara River
Action at the Mara River - Image by Moses Manduku
 Action at the Mara River
Action at the Mara River - Image by Moses Manduku
 Action at the Mara River
Action at the Mara River - Image by Moses Manduku
18 Jul 2016

After lunch, we headed over to the main crossing point, hoping to see a large crossing. We paused briefly to take a picture of wildebeest and zebra which are now just outside Governors’ Camp. As we arrived at the main crossing point on the Mara River, four zebra were half way across the river. They all made it safely to the other side.

When the zebra and wildebeest refused to cross, a young zebra led three other back across to the other side, perhaps to show the others how safe it was. After a few minutes, a large group of zebra gathered at the rivers edge, had a quick drink, and decided the time was right to cross. The zebra lead the charge, and made it across the river with apparent ease. Some young zebra struggled slightly to keep their heads above water but all made it across safely.

Moses, our guide, spotted a crocodile approaching. This crocodile appeared to be an inexperienced hunter, but with so many opportunities, it was unlikely to be hungry at the end of the day. The croc eventually managed to take down a zebra. The crossing paused momentarily and the animals gathered on the banks, looking nervously at the water.

One zebra decided to try another crossing point slightly further upstream and a large herd of wildebeest and zebra gathered behind. The zebra climbed in, swam half way and then decided to come back. We then returned to the other crossing point and hundreds of zebra, wildebeest and even topi crossed the river.

On the way back to camp we stopped and watched an approaching herd of elephants. They raised their trunks in the air, picking up scents in the distance. A group of vultures alerted us to a kill not too far away. We passed two lions feeding on a young wildebeest. The vultures were gathered near to another carcass, which three hyenas were feasting on. With the migration having arrived, there is plenty of food to go around for the predators of the Masai Mara.

William Slynn 
Governors’ Camp

Crocodile takes down zebra at the main crossing point
Crocodile takes down zebra at the main crossing point - Image by William Slynn
Crocodile takes down zebra at the main crossing point
Crocodile takes down zebra at the main crossing point - Image by William Slynn
Crocodile takes down zebra at the main crossing point
Crocodile takes down zebra at the main crossing point - Image by William Slynn
Crocodile takes down zebra at the main crossing point
Crocodile takes down zebra at the main crossing point - Image by William Slynn
Crocodile takes down zebra at the main crossing point
Crocodile takes down zebra at the main crossing point - Image by William Slynn
Crocodile takes down zebra at the main crossing point
Crocodile takes down zebra at the main crossing point - Image by William Slynn
15 Jul 2016

Hi HerdTracker,

Yesterday afternoon, large herds of wildebeest and zebra both resident and migratory had moved from the Topi Plains and Malima Tatu areas and into the East Marsh, Bila Shaka and Musiara grasslands.

Yesterday evening, a large crossing of wildebeest and zebra were seen going from west to east at the main crossing point, four wildebeest were taken by the resident crocodile, one yearling wildebeest that was caught by a crocodile struggled and kicked, it was able to get away with the crocodile only on its tail.

Photos are attached. 

Kind regards,
Ariana
Governors' Camps
 

Wildebeest move from west to east at the main crossing point
Wildebeest move from west to east at the main crossing point - Image by
Wildebeest move from west to east at the main crossing point
Wildebeest move from west to east at the main crossing point - Image by
Wildebeest move from west to east at the main crossing point
Wildebeest move from west to east at the main crossing point - Image by
Wildebeest move from west to east at the main crossing point
Wildebeest move from west to east at the main crossing point - Image by
Wildebeest move from west to east at the main crossing point
Wildebeest move from west to east at the main crossing point - Image by
Wildebeest move from west to east at the main crossing point
Wildebeest move from west to east at the main crossing point - Image by
04 Jul 2016

Hi HerdTracker,

Large herds of wildebeest and some zebra have crossed into the Rongai depression and are also moving across the Posee and Burrangat plains in long files.

There are concentrations of wildebeest massing on the short grass areas that were burnt earlier in the year. An estimated 500,000 animals are between the Sand River and the Burrangat Plains.

Kind regards,
Ariana
 

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